Tuesday, May 31, 2016

10th Mountain Division in Formation at Camp Hale

View taken from above looking down at Camp Hale, Colorado, showing 10 columns of men in formation and an honor guard, 1943 or 1944. Probably this parade included the most of the members of the U.S. 10th Mountain Division then in training. Vistors and their cars are parked on the farside of the field to view the formation parade. The photograph also provides a good view of the barracks and what appears to be the mule barns.  In 1942, Pando, Colorado, was a two-room train depot situated in the picturesque Eagle Park valley. By January 1943, an army camp filled the valley and was receiving the first men of the 10th Mountain Division for instruction in mountain and winter warfare, mountaineering, skiing and rock climbing. In less than eight months, the camp grew to accommodate a full U.S. Army Division of 14,000 men. On Maneuvers Ski troops trained in the Rockies at altitudes up to 14,000 feet, often under brutal weather conditions and for weeks at a time. As if nature were not enough of a challenge, the men carried rucksacks sometimes weighing as much as 90 lbs. Tents were home to 10th Mountain Division soldiers while on maneuvers. Thin fabric provided the only shelter from the elements. Rock Climbing was an important element of Divisional training. While some soldiers were recruited for their rock-climbing and mountaineering skills, the majority received specialized training. Mountains and rock formations around Camp Hale provided the ideal classroom for the soldiers. The training proved essential as troops from the 86th Regiment would make a night climb to capture German-held Riva Ridge in the Apennine Mountains of northern Italy.


Source :
http://amyatishkin.livejournal.com/287245.html
http://candiecoded.com/DarlingDollz//Violablu/Colorado/Colorado.html

Soldiers of 10th Mountain Division in front of Jerome Hotel

Five 10th Mountain Division Skitroopers in uniform stand outside a small store at the Jerome Hotel in Aspen, Colorado (1943 or 1944). Anthony Dillon, far left, holds skis. Man on far right is identified as photographer Bill Southworth. At the Jerome Hotel in Aspen, Colorado, the men unwind after a day of skiing. Even though the troops skied during training and camped in the cold and snow, when they had leave for the weekend, many of the soldiers could be found at nearby ski areas. After the war, several men of the 10th were instrumental in building the recreational ski industry that known today.


Source :
http://amyatishkin.livejournal.com/287245.html
http://candiecoded.com/DarlingDollz//Violablu/Colorado/Colorado.html

Soldiers of 10th Mountain Division in the Snow

Eleven U.S. 10th Mountain Division soldiers wearing white camouflage uniforms ("whites" or "over-whites") and brown knapsacks ascend a mountain slope during training, near Camp Hale, Colorado. Taken from a distance the photograph gives an indication of the the effectiveness of the camouflage. The skis were also painted white on the top surface as camouflage against the snow terrain. “Over-whites” referred to the all-white, hooded, thigh-length parka, matching trousers with a drawstring waist, and twofinger mitten-covers. These were made of thin cotton; they gave no appreciable protection from the cold, although early-issue parkas were provided with fur trim. The parka had buttoned openings at the waist to allow access to chest and trouser pockets, and to the pouches of the cartridge belt that was worn under it for weather protection. Soldiers were urged to keep over-whites clean to preserve their camouflage value. In fact, it was not uncommon for only the over-white parka to be worn; and wearing over-white trousers with an olive drab parka or jacket blended well when passing through snow-covered woodland.


Source :
Book "US 10th Mountain Division in World War II" by Gordon L. Rottman and Peter Dennis
http://amyatishkin.livejournal.com/287245.html
http://www.robertsarmory.com/10th2.htm

Photographer David B. Allen Wearing 10th Mountain Division Insignia

Portrait of the photographer of the U.S. 10th Mountain Division, David B. Allen, in front of the door to a barracks, 1944. He is wearing a cap and a field jacket and is standing in such a manner that the Tenth Mountain Division insignia, "the mountain patch" on his sleeve faces the camera. The 10th Mountain Division ACU patch features a powder keg shaped background with two bayonets crossed upwards. The bayonets are symbolic of infantry while the position of the bayonets simulates the numerical designation of the organization. The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 10th Light Division on 7 January 1944. It was designated for the 10th Mountain Division and a mountain tab was added on 22 November 1944. Although the proper branch insignia was crossed bayonets, some 10th Mountain Division soldiers in the three infantry regiments and one reconnaissance troop of the division wore crossed skis, often with a small US, eagle, or regimental number placed over or under the skis' intersection. Officers and some enlisted men wore the ski insignia above the left pocket, although a larger insignia intended for wear like a badge. Many enlisted men also wore the ornaments on the cap.


Source :
Book "Encyclopedia of United States Army Insignia and Uniforms" by William K. Emerson
http://amyatishkin.livejournal.com/287245.html
https://store.nwtmint.com/product_details/6444/U.S._Army_Patch_10th_Mountain_Infantry_Division_ACU_pair_/

Saturday, May 28, 2016

Hitler Inspecting the Hetzer

Adolf Hitler (third from right, Führer und oberster Befehlshaber der Wehrmacht) inspecting one of the first twenty Jagdpanzer 38 (Sd.Kfz.138/2) "Hetzer" (Baiter or Troublemaker) during official presentation for the 55th Führer's birthday at Arys (Orzysz) in East Prussia, 20 April 1944. After the demonstration they were sent directly back to the factory since they were not yet completely serviceable. The name "Hetzer" was at the time not commonly used for this vehicle. It was the designation for a related prototype, the E-10. The Škoda factory for a very short period confused the two names in its documentation and the very first unit equipped with the vehicle thus for a few weeks applied the incorrect name until matters were clarified. However, there exists a briefing paper from Heinz Guderian to Hitler claiming that an unofficial name, Hetzer, had spontaneously been coined by the troops. Post-war historians basing themselves on this statement made the name popular in their works, though the vehicle was never named as such in official documents!


Source :
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hetzer
http://fhsw.wikia.com/wiki/Jagdpanzer_38%28t%29_%22Hetzer%22

Hitler Watching the Parade of Hetzer

Arys (Orzysz) in East Prussia, 20 April 1944: Adolf Hitler and his entourage watching the parade of the first twenty Jagdpanzer 38 (Sd.Kfz.138/2) "Hetzer" (Baiter or Troublemaker) on an autobahn as a part of a somber 55th birthday celebration for the Führer. After the demonstration they were sent directly back to the factory since they were not yet completely serviceable. From left to right: Generaloberst Kurt Zeitzler (Chef des Generalstabes des Heeres), Reichsleiter Martin Bormann (Stabsleiter im Amt des Stellvertreters des Führers), Generalfeldmarschall Wilhelm Keitel (Chef des Oberkommando der Wehrmacht), Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring (Oberbefehlshaber der Luftwaffe), Hauptdienstleiter Dipl.-Ing. Karl-Otto Saur (Staatssekretär im Reichsministerium für Rüstung und Kriegsproduktion), unidentified panzer officer, and Adolf Hitler (Führer und oberster Befehlshaber der Wehrmacht). The man holding the film camera is Walter Frentz (21 August 1907 - 6 July 2004), one of Hitler's personal cameraman. from 1939 to 1945, he was closely associated with photographing and filming activities of higher echelons of leaders of Nazi Germany, including Hitler.


Source :
Book "Jagdpanzer 38 'Hetzer' 1944-45" by Hilary L. Doyle and Tom Jentz
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Frentz
https://www.ullsteinbild.de/ullstein-webshop/workbench.html?queryWord=walter+frentz&newTitle=ullstein+bild+|+Search%3A+walter+frentz&qwAction=searchQueryWord&viewMode=tile

Finnish Soldiers Advancing Under Barbed-Wire Obstacles

Finnish soldiers advancing under barbed-wire obstacles on the Hanko front. Fearing an assault over the ice during the oncoming winter, the Soviet garrison fled during the night of 2 December 1941. The evacuation of Hanko itself was performed in several convoys, between October 16 and December 2, 1941, which managed to transport roughly 23,000 troops to Leningrad. The fleet suffered casualties from Finnish minefields and coastal artillery, losing 3 destroyers and 2 large transports (Andrei Zhdanov and Iosif Stalin) as well as several smaller vessels. Finnish troops entering the area found it heavily mined.


Source :
Book "Finland at War: The Continuation and Lapland Wars 1941-45" by Vesa Nenye, Peter Munter, Toni Wirtanen and Chris Birks 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Hanko_%281941%29

A Bofors AA Gun on the Finnish Minelayer Ruotsinsalmi

A Bofors anti-aircraft gun on the Finnish minelayer Ruotsinsalmi. Ruotsinsalmi was armed with one 75-millimetre (3.0 in) gun, one Bofors 40 mm guns and two Madsen 20 mm anti-aircraft cannons. The vessel had three mine dropping rails, and could carry about 100 mines. Due to Soviet dominance of the Gulf of Finland and their strong presence at the leased Hanko naval base, the Finnish Navy’s operations were severely limited at the start of Continuation War. When the German advance progressed and the Finns captured strategically important islands on the gulf, the situation was reversed and the Red Fleet became bottled up near Leningrad.


Source :
Book "Finland at War: The Continuation and Lapland Wars 1941-45" by Vesa Nenye, Peter Munter, Toni Wirtanen and Chris Birks
http://maximietteita.blogspot.co.id/2015/07/minelayers-ruotsinsalmi-riilahti.html

Frontier City of Petroskoi / Äänislinna

Once the bustling frontier city of Petroskoi (Karelia/Soviet Union) was in Finnish hands in 1941, the name was quickly changed to Äänislinna (‘Castle by Lake Ääninen’). During the next few years Finns opened schools serving both the local population as well as the conquering soldiers. In addition to the institutions of higher education, the Finns also established concentration camps for civilians of Russian ethnicity which they operated until the Red Army liberated the area. Six camps were set up in Äänislinna, with 23,984 civilians of Russian ethnicity confined in them. Civilians of Finnish, Karelian or other Finnic descent were not interned into these camps. Some of the camps were old Soviet camps and some only fenced city areas. One source estimated almost 4,000 people perished there, primarily because of malnourishment, most dying during the spring and summer of 1942. The city was occupied by Finnish troops for nearly three years before it was retaken by Soviet forces on June 28, 1944. This image was taken from the ski-jump tower, looking towards Lake Ääninen, on 17 October 1941


Source :
Book "Finland at War: The Continuation and Lapland Wars 1941-45" by Vesa Nenye, Peter Munter, Toni Wirtanen and Chris Birks 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petrozavodsk

Finnish Infantry Advancing Through a Smoke Screen

Finnish Infantry advancing to a new position through a smoke screen - possibly in a training. The grand majority of Finnish infantry served in infantry regiments, which belonged to some certain division. Finnish Winter War era division and infantry regiment were much lighter and more weakly equipped armament-wise than their Soviet equivalents, hence the major improvement made by starting of Continuation War was giving them additional units, which gave them reasonable antitank- and antiaircraft-capacity, that they had been earlier lacking. Since the Soviets at the same time downsized their own divisions, in 1941 Finnish division actually ended up being larger than their Soviet equivalent. Around 1942 - 1943 Finnish Army downsized its divisions, but this was to release more manpower to home front, which was struggling to keep the military provided with weapons, food, ammunition and other equipment. While necessary, from purely military point of view this downsizing proved very poor idea, since it basically ruined the system in which way infantry regiments of division were used. After this downsizing divisions had only two infantry regiments, which made impossible the previous system of division typically using two of its regiments in frontline while keeping the third regiment as reserve. For all practical purposes this meant leaving divisions without their own reserves of useful size. At the same time Soviet infantry divisions developed to what could be described being close to brigade concept and relied more to firepower than manpower. During World War II Finnish Army also noted, that division was so large, that it was often difficult to command effectively. One solution for this problem was creating new (infantry) brigades around 1943 - 1944. These were units about size of infantry regiment, but with support units usually provided to Division. But the transition was not completed to many of the designed brigades and this new formation type didn't replace divisions in Finnish Army until after the war ended. Compared to their Soviet equivalent, Finnish divisions and infantry regiments were motorised in much lesser extent, even if the number of trucks in their use was considerably increased after Winter War (1939 - 1940).


Source :
Book "Finland at War: The Continuation and Lapland Wars 1941-45" by Vesa Nenye, Peter Munter, Toni Wirtanen and Chris Birks 
http://www.jaegerplatoon.net/FORMATIONS3.htm

Thursday, May 26, 2016

SS-Brigadeführer Otto Kumm

SS-Standartenführer Otto Kumm, seen here as a commander of SS-Panzergrenadier-Regiment "Der Führer" / SS-Panzergrenadier-Division "Das Reich" and later, as SS-Brigadeführer, became the third commander of the 7. SS-Freiwilligen-Gebirgs-Division "Prinz Eugen" (the first two being Artur "Papa" Phleps and Carl von Oberkamp). He received the Iron Cross First and Second Class during the French campaign, was awarded Knight’s Cross for his gallantry in 16 February 1942, the Oakleaves on 6 April 1943, and the Swords on 17 March 1945. His career ended as the last commander of the 1. SS-Panzer-Division "Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler". Kumm is best remembered for his exploits with the Das Reich Division in Russia. In February 1942, he was commander of the Der Führer Regiment of the division, which was battered by savage Soviet assaults in the area of Rzhev. When the attacks had stopped, Kumm took his regiment to divisional headquarters. There he met Generalfeldmarschall Walter Model, commander of the 9. Armee, who told him: “I know what your regiment has been through, Kumm, but I still can’t do without it. How strong is it now?" Kumm then pointed to the window: "My regiment is on parade outside." In the cold stood 35 men, the remains of a unit that had gone into combat 2000 strong...



Source :
http://5sswiking.tumblr.com/post/44152988758/ss-obersturmbannf%C3%BChrer-otto-kummseen-here-as
http://www.historicalwarmilitariaforum.com/index.php?app=core&module=search&do=search&fromMainBar=1

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Korvettenkapitän Klaus Feldt

Korvettenkapitän Klaus Feldt (14 April 1912 – 7 September 2010) posed proudly in a studio photo after he received the coveted Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub) in 1 January 1944 as chief of the 2. Schnellbootflottille (Fast Boat Flotilla). He is most famously credited with the destruction of HMS Exmoor on 25 February 1941 as commander of Schnellboot "S30" (HMS Exmoor was a 1,000 ton Hunt-class destroyer of the Royal Navy. She was a member of the first subgroup of the class, and saw service in the Second World War, before being sunk by German E-boats in 1941). Feldt himself was born as a son of Konteradmirals Constanz Feldt. On 1 April 1935 he joined the German Navy and served in various position and unit before finally stayed in Schnellbootwaffe and made a name for himself there. In his wartime career, he receives the following medals: Französische Rettungsmedaille II.Klasse (10 September 1933); Dienstauszeichnung IV.Klasse (5 April 1939); Spanienkreuz mit Schwertern in Bronze (6 June 1939); Medaille zur Erinnerung an die Heimkehr des Memellandes (26 October 1939); Eisernes Kreuz II.Klasse (16 November 1939); Medaille zur Erinnerung an den 1. Oktober 1938 (20 December 1939); Kriegsabzeichen für Minensuch-, U-Boot-Jagd- und Sicherungsverbände (1940); Eisernes Kreuz I.Klasse (28 April 1940); Ritterkreuz (25 April 1941); Verwundetenabzeichen in Schwarz (27 June 1941); Schnellboots-Kriegsabzeichen (19 December 1941); Zerstörer-Kriegsabzeichen (3 July 1942); Finnisches Freiheitskreuz IV.Klasse (5 December 1942); and Eichenlaub #362 (1 January 1944)


Source :
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klaus_Feldt
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Exmoor_%28L61%29
 http://www.historicalwarmilitariaforum.com/topic/6937-ritterkreuztr%C3%A4ger-photos-in-color-thread/page-2

Korvettenkapitän Helmut Möhlmann

U-boat ace Helmut Möhlmann (25 June 1913 – 12 April 1977) began his naval career in April 1933. He served on the light cruiser Nürnberg and in the first months of the war made some patrols on the torpedo boat Luchs. In April 1940 he transferred to the U-boat force. For three months he commanded the school boat U-143 before commissioning the Type VIIC U-571 in May 1941. He took her on eight patrols, mostly in the North Atlantic, but also in the Arctic. The fourth patrol was particularly successful: in one week he sank two ships, each over 10,000 tons! He left the boat in May 1943 to attend a course at the Naval Academy at Berlin. From September 1943 to December 1944 he served on the BdU org (Commander in Chief U-boats) staff. From December 1944 until the end of the war he commanded the 14th Flotilla at Narvik, Norway. He was promoted to Korvettenkapitän (corvette captain) on 1 April 1945. After the surrender he spent more than four months in captivity. Möhlmann rejoined the military service of the post World War II Bundeswehr of the Federal Republic of Germany. He entered the Bundesmarine on 1 July 1960 holding the rank of Fregattenkapitän (frigate captain). He served as military attaché at the German Embassy in Rio de Janeiro, Brasil from 24 August 1965 to 24 November 1969. His last service position was Wehrbereichskommandant VI in Munich before retiring on 31 March 1970. As a U-boat commander in World War II, he sank 7 ships (47,169 tons) and damaged another one (11,394 tons). Möhlmann received the Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes (Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross) on 16 April 1943 as Kapitänleutnant and commander of U-571, after 8 patrols, 344 days at sea.


Source :
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmut_M%C3%B6hlmann 
http://www.historicalwarmilitariaforum.com/topic/6937-ritterkreuztr%C3%A4ger-photos-in-color-thread/page-2
http://uboat.net/men/moehlmann.htm

Oberleutnant d.R. Alfred Schreiber

Oberleutnant der Reserve Alfred Schreiber (3 March 1914 in Praterschütz, Meißen, Sachsen - 24 September 1991 in Meerbusch-Strümp, Westfalen) received the Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes (Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross) in 20 April 1943 as a Oberfeldwebel and Zugführer (Platoon Leader) in 6.Kompanie / II.Bataillon / Grenadier-Regiment 365 / 211.Infanterie-Division / LIII.Armeekorps / 2.Panzerarmee / Heeresgruppe Mitte. He also receives Eisernes Kreuzes II.Klasse und I.Klasse (Iron Cross 2nd Class and 1st Class), Infanterie-Sturmabzeichen (Infantry Assault Badge), and Medaille "Winterschlacht im Osten 1941/42" (Ostmedaille).


Source :
http://www.historicalwarmilitariaforum.com/topic/6937-ritterkreuztr%C3%A4ger-photos-in-color-thread/page-2

Oberfeldwebel Johann Schwerdfeger, the Inspiration for "Cross of Iron"

Formal studio portarait of Oberfeldwebel Johann Schwerdfeger, a pre-war professional soldier, probably created in connection with his award of the Eichenlaub zum Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes (Oak Leaves to the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross), received in 14 May 1944 when he served as a Zugführer (platoon leader) in the 1.Kompanie / I.Bataillon / Jäger-Regiment 228 / 101.Jäger-Division. Schwerdfeger soldiered from 1935 to 1937 in Infanterie-Regiment 84, and in 1939 was transferred to the third company of Infanterie-Regiment 186 of the 73. Infanterie-Division, at the Polish Campaign's start. In June 1942, after serving in Jägerersatzbataillon 75, Schwerdfeger joined Jäger-Regiment 228 of the 101. Jäger-Division, who fought in the Don Bend, at Rostov, and at Maikop, in the Caucasus, and joined the retreat through the Kuban and the Taman Peninsula. On 17 May 1943 Schwerdfeger was awarded the Ritterkreuz (Knight's Cross) for his extraordinary bravery in the battlefield. In April 1944, in the breakout from Hube's Pocket, he was severely wounded, and was awarded the Eichenlaub for his Ritterkreuz; moreover, Sergeant Schwerdfeger also earned two Panzervernichtungsabzeichen (tank destruction badges), meaning that he singlehandedly destroyed two enemy tanks with hand-held weapon. Schwerdfeger was able to recover from his wounds sustained in Hube's Pocket and served the remainder of the war. He passed away in December 2015. The novel, "The Willing Flesh", by veteran Willi Heinrich, and the famous World War II movie "Cross of Iron" (based on the novel), is generally recognised as being loosely based on Schwerdfeger's experiences as an NCO in Jäger-Regiment 228 in the course of that unit's retreat through the Kuban and Taman Peninsula in the late stages of the war. If this is "Steiner", he is a worthy model!


Source :
http://www.warrelics.eu/forum/photos-papers-propaganda-third-reich/show-your-signed-photos-284539-56/
http://www.ww2incolor.com/german/Johann_20Schwerdfeger.html

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Hitler Examines Model of Heavy Fortifications and Bunkers

Hitler examines model of heavy fortifications and bunkers, September-October 1942. From left to right: Generalfeldmarschall Wilhelm Keitel (Chef des Oberkommando der Wehrmacht), Adolf Hitler (Führer und oberster Befehlshaber der Wehrmacht), Oberst Erich Kahsnitz (Führerreserve im Oberkommando des Heeres), and General der Pioniere Alfred Jacob (General der Pioniere und Festungen im Oberkommando des Heeres). Kahsnitz is taking down Hitler's comments. He would command the Füsilier-Regiment Großdeutschland in 20 October 1942 and Severely wounded near Byelgorod during the Battle of Kursk in 5 July 1943. He died of his wounds on 29 July 1943 in Breslau and was posthumously promoted to Generalmajor.


Source :
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/444308319458249407/

Hitler Visiting Wounded Soldiers in 1943

Adolf Hitler (Führer und oberster Befehlshaber der Wehrmacht) visiting wounded soldiers in Unter den Linden, Berlin, as a part of Heldengedenktag ceremony, 21 March 1943 (when sometimes in 1942 Hitler was cautioned that his soldiers were dying in enormous numbers on the Eastern front, he reportedly responded to the effect that "Well, that's what soldiers are for"). On 27 February 1934, the National Socialists introduced national holiday legislation to create Heldengedenktag ("Day of Commemoration of Heroes") as a change to the previous Volkstrauertag (People's Mourning Day), cementing the observance. In the process, they completely changed the character of the holiday: the emphasis shifted to hero worship rather than remembering the dead. Furthermore, five years later the Nazis abolished Buß- und Bettag (Day of repentance and prayer) as a non-working day and moved its commemoration to the following Sunday, to further the war effort. Joseph Goebbels as Propaganda Minister, issued guidelines on content and implementation, instructing that flags no longer be flown at half-mast. The last Heldengedenktag was celebrated in 1945. This picture was taken by one of the photographer from Presse-Illustrationen Heinrich Hoffmann and first published in 22 March 1943


Source :
https://bildarchiv.bsb-muenchen.de/metaopac/singleHit.do?methodToCall=showHit&curPos=81&identifier=368_SOLR_SERVER_642289375
http://www.ww2incolor.com/german_leadership/E0428_ROSPG2004029003901.html

Top Third Reich Officials at Heldengedenktag 1943

German top military officials standing at the podium in Unter den Linden, Berlin, for Heldengedenktag (Day of Commemoration of Heroes) parade, 21 March 1943. From left to right: Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring (Oberbefehlshaber der Luftwaffe), Generalfeldmarschall Wilhelm Keitel (Chef des Oberkommando der Wehrmacht), Großadmiral Karl Dönitz (Oberbefehlshaber der Kriegsmarine), Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler (Reichsführer SS und Chef der Deutschen Polizei), and Adolf Hitler (Führer und oberster Befehlshaber der Wehrmacht). The picture was taken by one of the photographer from Presse-Illustrationen Heinrich Hoffmann and first published in 22 March 1943


Source :
http://der-fuehrer.org/Galleries/Farbe_Fotos/index3.html
http://www.gettyimages.com/pictures/german-empire-berlin-heldengedenktag-1943-soldiers-of-the-news-photo-545722943#german-empire-berlin-heldengedenktag-1943-soldiers-of-the-wehrmacht-picture-id545722943
https://www.ullsteinbild.de/ullstein-webshop/workbench.html?queryWord=g%C3%B6ring+keitel+d%C3%B6nitz+himmler+hitler&newTitle=ullstein+bild+|+Search%3A+g%C3%B6ring+keitel+d%C3%B6nitz+himmler+hitler&qwAction=searchQueryWord&viewMode=tile

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

David B. Allen in "Whites"

Portrait of David B. Allen in his "whites" or winter uniform posed in the same postion as the "Ski Trooper" cover of the Saturday Evening Post. He is crouching close to the ground and carrying a knapsack with a white cover, a rifle and is holding his skis and poles crossed in front of him. Snow covers the ground and Camp Hale barracks are in the background. The picture was taken in 1943 or 1944


Source :
http://amyatishkin.livejournal.com/287245.html

Barracks at Camp Hale (Colorado)

View taken from the corner of A and 18th streets at Camp Hale, Colorado (the training center of the US 10th Mountain Division), showing the streets signs, barracks and a jeep. The aspen trees on the surrounding hills have spring leaves. Creating this camp was quite a feat of engineering and wartime construction. Beginning in April of 1942, an army of workmen completed the camp by December of that year... all for a price tag of $30 million. There were accommodations for over 16,000 troops and 4,000 mules and horses. The 87th Mountain Infantry Regiment moved into the new camp in January 1943, while another regiment, the 86th, was being formed. The picture was taken by David B. Allen in 1943 or 1944.

Source :
http://amyatishkin.livejournal.com/287245.html
http://www.slideshare.net/tcattermole/10th20-mountain20division20-20introduction1-7846475

View of a Chapel at Camp Hale

View of a chapel at Camp Hale, Colorado, training headquarters of the Tenth Mountain Division, showing the chapel at the right, telephone poles, a road and barracks in the background. The chapel is a standard army chapel, administered by military chaplain. Chaplains have served in the various branches of the United States armed forces since their formation, including in the Continental Army during the American Revolution. Congress authorized the hiring of an Army chaplain in 1791.


Source :
http://amyatishkin.livejournal.com/287245.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_military_chaplains

Soldiers of the US 10th Mountain Division Playing Cards

Eight Tenth Mountain Division soldiers sit on the ground playing a card game in their spare time while in training at Camp Hale, Colorado, 1943 or 1944. All are wearing khaki uniforms and caps. Playing cards is one of the item on their canvas bag, apart from other essential items such as toothbrush, toothpaste, razorblades, and cigarettes. The picture was taken by David B. Allen


Source :
http://amyatishkin.livejournal.com/287245.html

Monday, May 16, 2016

Adolf Hitler on a Ride Through Münich

People enthusiastically greet Hitler on a ride through Münich in a Mercedes-Benz 770 open car, 1942. Standing in the back seat is his personal Adjutant, SS-Untersturmführer Otto Günsche. The picture was taken by Walter Frentz, one of Hitler's personal photographer. On 8 November 1942 - the eve of the anniversary of the 1923 Nazi Putsch - Hitler addresses his party members in Münich. He repeatedly declared that Germany would make no more offers of peace. He dismissed the North African campaign in a few words, but devoted much time to justifying his troops' lack of progress in Russia. In his concluding words he begged his audience to make their every deed and thought a prayer "for our Germany". The quotations are taken from the speech: "People say it is a strategic blunder that the Germans have gone to Stalingrad. Just let us wait and see whether that was a strategic blunder..."


Source :
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205055625
https://www.ullsteinbild.de/ullstein-webshop/workbench.html?queryWord=otto+g%C3%BCnsche&newTitle=ullstein+bild+|+Search%3A+otto+g%C3%BCnsche&qwAction=searchQueryWord&viewMode=tile

Adolf Hitler in Front of His Newly Built Bunker

Adolf Hitler (Führer und Reichskanzler des Grossdeutschen Reiches) in front of a newly built bunker at his Führerhauptquartier 'Wolfsschanze' near Rastenburg, East Prussia, 18 September 1944. With the back to the camera is his personal adjutant, SS-Obersturmführer Otto Günsche, while the cropped body at left belong to Generalfeldmarschall Wilhelm Keitel (Chef des Oberkommando der Wehrmacht). The picture itself was taken by Walter Frentz, one of Hitler's personal photographer.


High ranking officials of the Third Reich in front of a newly built bunker at Führerhauptquartier 'Wolfsschanze' near Rastenburg, East Prussia, 18 September 1944. From left to right: Großadmiral Karl Dönitz (Oberbefehlshaber der Kriegsmarine), Generalfeldmarschall Wilhelm Keitel (Chef des Oberkommando der Wehrmacht), Adolf Hitler (back to the camera, Führer und Reichskanzler des Grossdeutschen Reiches), Joachim von Ribbentrop (Reichsminister des Auswärtigen), and SS-Obersturmführer Otto Günsche (back to the camera, persönlicher Adjutant Adolf Hitler). The picture was taken by Walter Frentz, one of Hitler's personal photographer.


Source :
https://www.ullsteinbild.de/ullstein-webshop/workbench.html?queryWord=otto+g%C3%BCnsche&newTitle=ullstein+bild+|+Search%3A+otto+g%C3%BCnsche&qwAction=searchQueryWord&viewMode=tile

Sunday, May 15, 2016

Hitler Residence at Berghof (Obersalzberg)


Inspired by poet and play writer Dietrich Eckart, Adolf Hitler was interested in the Obersalzberg Mountain in Bavaria, Germany. Still living in Münich, he left for the Obersalzberg whenever the opportunity presented itself. At first Hitler on the Obersalzberg stayed in hotels, but after the release of his imprisonment for the failed coup in 1923 he rented a small house. Still burdened with a speaking ban after his conviction, he rented this house to get peace of mind and concentrate on something he had been wanting to do for a long time. It is here that he dictated the second volume of “Mein Kampf” to Rudolf Hess. After this, the house was referred to as “the Kampfhaus” (English: Battle Hause) by the members of his National Socialist Party. And it was in this house where the political course of actions were discussed by Hitler and his followers of the first hour.

But Hitler was seeking permanent living space on the mountain. In 1928 he rented “Haus Wachenfeld” from the widow Winter, which he eventually bought from her on 17 September 1933, when he had already been appointed as Chancellor of Germany. He bought the house, which was only a few hundred meters away from the former Kampfhaus, for 40,000 Reichsmark. In 1920 the Obersalzberg was already a tourist attraction; there were farms, hotels, Inns and spas. After Hitler bought Haus Wachenfeld, he changed the name to “Berghof”, and the layout was altered quite a bit. It was rebuilt, twice. The huge window was installed to enjoy the stunning view on the Unterbergmassiv mountains, the famous stairs were added and so on.

Albert Speer, Martin Bormann and Herman Göring moved to the Obersalzberg as well. Bormann bought an area of 10,000 square meters of the mountain and started to rearrange the mountain to his Führers needs. Civilians were moved off the mountain, some volunteered to leave, others were bought out or received an emptied house of deported Jews elsewhere. The ones who refused were intimidated, or even ended up in concentration camp Dachau. Their houses were demolished and others built up as the Führer ordered.

In 1937 all former residents of the Obersalzberg had left the mountain. But the Obersalzberg wasn’t deserted, on the contrary. The number of people living on the mountain grew with 69% after the takeover by the Nazis. This government city had country homes, barracks, garages, botanic gardens, tea houses, hotels, guesthouses, districts for staff, cinemas and so on. On an average day about 3.000 labourers worked on the Obersalzberg, the total cost for rearranging the mountain came upon 980 million Reichsmark.

Adolf Hitler fled Berlin whenever he could for longer periods of time and lived at the Berghof with a complete staff, his half sister Angela Raubal and daughter Geli Raubal (The latter killed herself in Munich after rumors of an affair with Adolf Hitler). Later on Eva Braun stayed at the Berghof. Eva was the secret mistress of Adolf Hitler, which he kept from the German public for a number of reasons.

The Obersalzberg had 2.000 Waffen SS soldiers stationed there for guarding the mountain and keeping the Führer safe. The Obersalzberg became a tourist attraction during the Nazi heydays. On some days more than 5.000 fans visited the Obersalzberg to get a glimpse of the Führer. The hysteria these pilgrims caused was unimaginable. They even took the cobble stones were the Führer had walked as reminder back home!

Hitler frequently visited a tea-house at Mooslahnerkopf during his daily walks on the Obersalzberg. In 1938 a new tea-house, the Kehlsteinhaus, was built on top of the Obersalzberg mountain. Martin Bormann started this project as a gift from the Nazi Party, the NSDAP, to Adolf Hitler on his 50th anniversary. This Kehlsteinhaus is better known as the “Eagles Nest”. This new teahouse wasn’t liked much by Hitler. In fact he only visited it just a few times. The tea-house on the Mooslahnerkopf remained his favorite place. He kept on taking his daily walk toward this tea house and enjoyed to view on the Unterbergmassiv and Kneifelspitze, two mountains which were visible from here.

The Berghof was a political residence from 1936 on. From 1936 until 1941 every official visit took place at the Berghof. Queens, Princesses, Ministers, Presidents, Businessmen, Ambassadors and Bishops alike all came to the Berghof. The treaty of non aggression with the Russian minister Molotov was set up here. Or the promise made of not going to war to Prime Minister Chamberlain, a big lie to the British and the rest of the world, was signed here.

The Obersalzberg was bombed by hundreds of British Lancaster bombers, including aircraft from No. 617 Squadron RAF ("The Dam Busters"), on 25 April 1945, twelve days before the surrender of German forces on 7 May. At least two bombs struck the Berghof. On 4 May, four days after Hitler's suicide in Berlin, departing SS troops set fire to the villa. Only hours later, the U.S. 3rd Infantry Division arrived at Berchtesgaden along with the French 2nd Armoured Division. In his interview with the Library of Congress, Herman Louis Finnell of the 3rd Division, 7th Regiment, Company I, stated that he and his ammo carrier, Pfc. Fungerburg, were the first to enter Berghof, as well as the secret passages below the structure. Finnell stated that the hallway below the structure had rooms on either side filled with destroyed paintings, evening gowns, as well as destroyed medical equipment and a wine cellar. The Americans reportedly muddled Berchtesgaden with the Berghof and a French Army captain along with his driver were the first Allied personnel to reach the still-smoldering chalet. A French tank crew soon joined them. Over the next few days, Allied soldiers thoroughly looted and stripped the house. The American 1st Battalion of the 506th Infantry Regiment (led by Company C) arrived four days later, on 8 May. The 3rd Battalion of the 506th came into Berchtesgaden by a different route and sustained casualties in a skirmish with the crews of two German 88 mm guns. One of the most notable artifacts taken by American soldiers was Hitler's Globe.


Source :
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berghof_%28residence%29
http://historicalsocietyofgermanmilitaryhistory.com/third-reich-nazi-germany/fuhrers-headquarters-official-sites/
http://www.landmarkscout.com/the-berghof-adolf-hitlers-residence-under-the-eagles-nest/
http://thirdreichcolorpictures.blogspot.co.id/2010/10/berghof-in-color.html

Walter Warlimont and Wilhelm Keitel at Berghof

From left to right: General der Artillerie Walter Warlimont (Stellvertreter von Generaloberst Alfred Jodl im Wehrmachtführungsstab) and Generalfeldmarschall Wilhelm Keitel (Chef des Oberkommando der Wehrmacht) at the terrace of the Berghof, Obersalzberg, 1944. Warlimont became renowned, with Keitel and Jodl, as one of the German officers most loyal to Hitler and was accordingly sentenced to 18 years' imprisonment in 1949 as a minor war criminal. The picture was taken by Walter Frentz


Source :
http://historicalsocietyofgermanmilitaryhistory.com/third-reich-nazi-germany/fuhrers-headquarters-official-sites/

Otto Günsche at Berghof

Third Reich high ranking officials at the terrace of Berghof, 1944. Hitler's aide-de-camp, SS-Obersturmführer Otto Günsche, is in the center. The Berghof was Adolf Hitler's residence in the Obersalzberg of the Bavarian Alps near Berchtesgaden, Bavaria, Germany. Other than the Wolfsschanze ("Wolf's Lair"), his headquarters in East Prussia for the invasion of the Soviet Union, Hitler spent more time at the Berghof than anywhere else during World War II. It was also one of the most widely known of his headquarters, which were located throughout Europe. Guests at the Berghof included political figures, monarchs, heads of state and diplomats along with painters, singers and musicians. The important visitors personally greeted on the steps of the Berghof by Hitler included David Lloyd George (3 March 1936), the Aga Khan (20 October 1937), Duke and Duchess of Windsor (22 October 1937), Kurt von Schuschnigg (12 February 1938), Neville Chamberlain (15 September 1938) and Benito Mussolini (19 January 1941). On 11 May 1941 Karlheinz Pintsch visited the Berghof to deliver a letter from Rudolf Hess informing him of his illegal flight to Scotland. At the end of July 1940 Hitler summoned his military chiefs from OKW and OKH to the Berghof for the 'Berghof Conference' at which the 'Russian problem' was studied.


Source :
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berghof_%28residence%29
http://thirdreichcolorpictures.blogspot.co.id/2010/10/berghof-in-color.html

General Vladimir Kirpichnikov as a POW of the Finns

Major-General Vladimir Kirpichnikov with a packet of Chesterfield cigarettes at the Kyöliö officers’ prison in November 1943. He was the only prisoner of general rank that the Finns captured during the wars! Kirpichnikov was captured by the Finns near the city of Viborg on 1 September 1941. He was first interrogated in the village of Karisalmi and later moved to Finnish Army headquarters in Mikkeli. The Finns wanted to use Kirpichnikov for propagandist purposes since they knew he had some opinions that were critical of the Soviet regime. However, Kirpichnikov did not agree to work for the Finns. In December 1941 he was moved to Sotavankileiri 1 (Prison camp 1), which was located in the municipality of Köyliö in Western Finland. It was a camp for more than 3,000 Soviet prisoners, including 1,000 officers. According to other prisoners, Kirpichnikov was offered the commander's post of the Russian Liberation Army but he refused. The pictures taken of Kirpichnikov were used as a propaganda tool. Most famous are a picture of Kirpichnikov lighting the cigarette of his interrogator, General Lennart Oesch, and this color photo of Kirpichnikov with a newspaper and a pack of Chesterfield cigarettes. He was also seen in a Finnish propaganda film. After the war was over, Kirpichnikov was sent back to the Soviet Union where he was immediately arrested by the SMERSH. Kirpichnikov was held in a prison camp in Podolsk, then later at Lefortovo Prison in Moscow. He was charged with treason and sentenced to death by the USSR Military Collegium on 8 October 1950. Two days later, Kirpichnikov was shot. Some sources report the date of his execution as 28 August 1950, prior to the recorded death sentence.


Source :
 Book "Finland at War: The Continuation and Lapland Wars 1941-45" by Vesa Nenye, Peter Munter, Toni Wirtanen and Chris Birks 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_Kirpichnikov_%28general%29

Finnish Soldiers Displaying a Map of the Soviet Union Captured at the Porlampi Motti

Finnish Soldiers displaying a map of the Soviet Union captured at the Porlampi motti, autumn of 1941. In the background is a T-37A amphibious tank. Here some 7,000 Soviet soldiers died and 9,000 was captured, including Major General Vladimir Kirpitsnikov. Almost 12,000 soldiers managed to escape before the encirclement was complete, but all the heavy equipment was behind. Finns captured 360 cannons, 246 mortars, 272 machineguns, 55 tanks, 673 cars and trucks, 300 tractors and some 4500 horses.


Source :
 Book "Finland at War: The Continuation and Lapland Wars 1941-45" by Vesa Nenye, Peter Munter, Toni Wirtanen and Chris Birks 
http://www.ww2incolor.com/finnish_forces/Porlammi-Sommee_encirclement_1941.html

Finnish NCO Inspects the Russian Vehicles Captured at the Porlampi Motti

A Finnish junior sergeant inspects the Russian vehicles captured at the Porlampi motti on 5 September 1941. Here some 9,000 Soviet soldiers were captured by Finns, along with their leader Major General Vladimir Kirpitsnikov, while 7,000 of their comrades died in the encirclement and some 12,000 managed to escape, having to leave behind all heavy equipment.


Source :
Book "Finland at War: The Continuation and Lapland Wars 1941-45" by Vesa Nenye, Peter Munter, Toni Wirtanen and Chris Birks 
http://www.ww2incolor.com/finnish_forces/BillionMotti_Porlammi-Sommee_encirclement_1941.html

Friday, May 13, 2016

A German Sniper in Stalingrad

A German sniper (scharfschütze) from 6. Armee takes aim with a Karabiner 98k rifle with mounted Soviet Mosin Nagant PE scope on the outskirts of of Stalingrad (now Volgograd), September 1942. The five month long battle would be one of the bloodiest battle in the history of warfare. According to archival figures, the Soviets suffered 1,129,619 total casualties; 478,741 personnel killed or missing, and 650,878 wounded or sick. The Axis suffered 850,000 total casualties (wounded, killed, captured) among all branches of the German armed forces and its allies; 400,000 Germans, 200,000 Romanians, 130,000 Italians, and 120,000 Hungarians and smaller numbers of Croatian, Slovak, French, Spanish and others were killed, wounded or captured.


Source :
http://bag-of-dirt.tumblr.com/post/144261140910/a-german-sniper-takes-aim-with-a-karabiner-98k
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bundesarchiv_Bild_169-0525,_Russland,_Scharfsch%C3%BCtze_in_Stellung.jpg

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Miniature Castle as Hitler's Birthday Gift

Hand-worked castle inlaid with precious stones given to Hitler as an extravagant gifts for his 50th birthday, 20 April 1939. The picture was taken by German photographer Hugo Jaeger. In the late 1930s, very few photographers were using color film. Jaeger was an early adopter, and when Adolf Hitler was introduced to Jaeger’s work, he liked what he saw. “The future,” Hitler reportedly told Jaeger, “belongs to color photography.” Between 1936 and 1945, Jaeger was granted unprecedented access to Hitler, traveling and chronicling, in color, the Führer and his confidants at small gatherings, public events and, quite often, in private moments.


Source :
http://amazingdata.com/hitler-color-photographs-from-life-com/
http://www.gettyimages.com/galleries/photographers/hugo_jaeger
http://www.i-am-bored.com/2015/02/hitlers-50th-birthday-in-color-april-1939-pix.html
http://time.com/3881059/adolf-hitler-color-photos-his-inner-circle-and-hangers-on/

British PM Chamberlain Waves to Spectators in Münich

British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain waves to spectators from an open-top car, shortly after leaving Oberwiesenfeld airport on the way to a meeting with Adolf Hitler over the latter's threats to invade Czechoslovakia, Münich, Germany, 28 September 1938. Sensing a looming catastrophe, Chamberlain flew to Münich to meet with Hitler and other European leaders – to try to work out a 'peaceful' settlement to the growing 'crisis' (which was completely a fabrication of Hitler's). Ultimately Chamberlain signed an agreement in which Hitler promised that he had no more territorial ambitions towards Czechoslovakia beyond the Sudetenland (a complete lie), and in which Chamberlain promised that he would lean on the Czech president Beneš to peacefully deliver the Sudetenland to Germany. Chamberlain congratulated himself on this supposedly brilliant piece of statesmanship because he understood that through this agreement between Hitler and himself he had saved Europe from falling into another horrible shooting match and indeed had secured “peace in our time.”


Source :
http://www.gettyimages.co.uk/detail/news-photo/british-prime-minister-neville-chamberlain-waves-to-news-photo/50537963
http://images.google.com/hosted/life/6de48dcd04bd124a.html
http://www.kingsacademy.com/mhodges/03_The-World-since-1900/06_Dictatorship/06d_Steps-toward-War.htm

Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Krupp Protze and BMW R12 Sidecar of Panzergruppe Guderian

A group of Krupp L 2 H 143 trucks as personnel carriers (Kfz.70) proves its off-road capability in the Russian swamp, 1941. The white "G" indicates Panzergruppe 2 (Guderian). Note the two-line license plates on the front bumper. Unfortunately, the division emblem on the BMW R12 motorcycle with sidecar cannot be read clearly. The L 2 H 43 and L 2 H 143 "Krupp-Protze" (unofficial designation) was a six-wheeled 6x4 German truck and artillery tractor produced between 1934 and 1941 and heavily used in World War II. It was powered by a 55 hp or 60 hp (since 1936) Krupp M 304 4-cylinder petrol engine. Its main purpose was to tow artillery, especially the PaK 36, and transport motorized infantry. This vehicle was extensively used on the Eastern Front, during the North African campaign and in France and Sicily. The "Krupp-Protze" was of relatively advanced design. Its fuel consumption was relatively high (24 Litres / 100 km on road) in comparison to the comparable Opel Blitz 1.5 t truck (16.5 liters / 100 km, produced 1938 - 1942). Total production was about 7,000 units.


Source :
Book "Krupp at War: The Legendary Krupp Protze & Other Vehicles" by Reinhard Frank
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krupp_Protze